Visit Flamborough

Flamborough is one of my favourite local (ish) places to visit. An hour up the coast it is a small village 4 miles north-east of Bridlington.

Flamborough is amazing for outdoor adventure lovers with its interesting rock formations, caves, rock pools to explore, and lots more. It is also home to one of the uk’s most famous RSPB reserves – Bempton Cliffs, where around half a million seabirds, including puffins, gather to breed and raise their chicks between March and October on the colossal chalk cliffs.

We’ve yet to explore so much of Flamborough but here are some of the highlights of our trips to hopefully entice you to visit and show this beautiful area some love.

Flamborough Head

Flamborough Head

Simply beautiful wherever you look with stunning views over the vast chalk cliffs and rocky ground, you can’t fail to have your breath taken. You can follow the coastal path along which will bring you on a visit here, or as we did, picked up the coastal path for a short walk to see this little beauty – The Drinking Dinosaur – an amazing natural rock formation caused by years of erosion by the sea. From the right angle it resembles a sauropod drinking from the sea.

The Drinking Dinosaur

We have visited this next section of Flamborough head twice now, accessible by some pretty steep steps it isn’t for everyone. Getting down is much easier than getting back up. But it is sure to bring out the explorer in you. Kids (and adults alike) will love the rock pools that appear when the tide goes out, seals are also a frequent visitor, and there are plenty of little nooks and crannies to explore.

There are so many interesting rocks to find too, these captivate Toby, my 5 year old mini explorer every time. You’ll see in some of the later pics above that his hoodie is stretched from the weight of his favourite rocks that he smuggled up the sheer steps.

Flamborough Lighthouse

This working lighthouse is a magnificent display acting as a waypoint for passing deep sea vessels and coastal traffic. Currently closed due to covid and we have only seen it from the outside but were fascinated nonetheless. We live opposite a lighthouse ourselves but it is no longer active so this was such a novelty. This lighthouse was built in 1806 replacing the previous lighthouse built in 1669 (which still stands down the road).

Danes Dyke

I absolutely love Danes Dyke, a beautiful nature reserve with lots of scientific and natural importance. It’s earthworks are believed to date back to the dark ages.

We love to park up in the car park and walk through the woods to the stunning coastal vista that greets you at the end but in the past we have walked for some time around the woods, discovering tree swings left behind by others. It’s one of my favourite places in Flamborough and Toby’s too as we don’t have woods like this near us for him to explore.

The pebble beach at Danes Dyke is made up of so many weird and wonderful rocks, the bigger the better when you’re 5, and you can also join the coastal path to admire the entire Flamborough coastline from the cliff top.

Thornwick Bay

Thornwick Bay

Our latest visit to Flamborough saw us investigating the natural arches and hideaways on Thornwick Bay. The first time we visited we arrived at high tide so couldn’t explore like we would have liked but yesterday the tide was out and we immediately set out to see as much as we could before the tide turned and started coming for us.

The rocky beach is accessed by steps and the view that greets you as you descend is sure to get everyone excited.

Descending the steppy path to Thornwick Bay

There are no dog restrictions on Thornwick Bay and you can swim and bathe here also. Sea shoes are a must for the rocky ground underneath.

We started by exploring a beautiful natural arch to the right before venturing under another arch at the other side of the beach round into a whole new beach. It’s a good work out scrambling across the uneven rocks and climbing the rocky steps that take you along the beach. If you do get caught out here by the tide, or just don’t want to walk back there is a precarious staircase that we ascended to take us back to the Thornwick Bay cafe. This path could be dangerous in anything other than dry conditions I think as it appears there’s been some shift in the steps and some are missing, but it was dry yesterday and we managed it easily enough with a 5 year old in tow.

If you are confident you have time on your side you can continue around the coast to discover further. We probably had plenty of time but chose to go back up to visit the cafe for a drink and ice cream.

Parking is £1.50 for the day and there is a caravan park nearby yet the place wasn’t packed with people which is perfect for us.

I’d love to know if you’ve been inspired to visit Flamborough by my post or if you already love the area where is your favourite place to visit? Any secret hotspots for us to discover?

The accidental holiday!

At the beginning of April I was boredom holiday shopping for the upcoming half term less than a fortnight later. Boredom shopping is never a good thing where I’m concerned. I was browsing the Eurocamp website when I came across a holiday for 5 days including the ferry for all 6 of us for £170. £95 for the accommodation (caravan) and the rest was ferry/cleaning deposit.

Goodbye England, hello France

I mean come on, how could I pass that up. I booked it there and then and excitedly planned for our trip. I wasn’t optimistic, I imagined all sorts of horrors would greet us on our arrival. Luckily I couldn’t have been more wrong, and after the 10 hour drive from Calais to Carnac (I’m a terrible navigator) we were relieved to see a wonderful little site.

Des Menhirs campsite

We stayed at the Des Menhirs campsite in Carnac, it was that time of year where realistically you could get hoodie/coat weather, or if you were lucky you could have sunburn weather, we were lucky and most days were low 20s. The pool was cool but didn’t stop people going in and then there was the water slides. Wow! The kids were up and down those all day long.

Carnac itself has a beautiful beach, some typically touristy shops, and lots of very friendly English speakers.

Carnac

This was turning out better than our half board holiday to Spain 6 months earlier.

We visited Quiberon peninsula which is a short drive from Carnac where we enjoyed climbing over a rocky base, exploring crystal clear rock pools and beautiful views over the Bay of Biscay.

Crystal clear rock pools in Quiberon

My only complaint would be the accommodation, we had an ant infestation which was annoying but not the end of the world, and the vans were so close together you could hear children running around next door. It was my only complaint but for the price how could I really complain?
We would 100% go again, but I wouldn’t sail to Calais again. I’d spend a little more to sail to St Malo or Caen to cut down on driving time and fuel costs ( We spent over £400 in fuel alone!!). I would also pay a little extra for bigger accommodation so we wouldn’t be quite so cramped. If you don’t mind a caravanning holiday check this place out!! Your kids will definitely thank you for it.